BMK6100 Marketing Pro-seminar

This module seeks to provide marketing doctoral students with an orientation to current research in the field of marketing. The primary objectives are to provide students with exposure to representative samples of significant research streams, current issues, and research priorities in the marketing field, and to introduce entering doctoral students to the research interests of the NUS marketing faculty. Students are expected to get themselves familiar with the key research stems in the field of marketing. They are also expected to identify some areas of research interests and come up with research ideas in such areas.

BMK6101 Perspectives in Consumer Behaviour

The focus of this seminar is on studying consumer’s decision processes. This seminar will provide Ph.D. level coverage of various topics in consumer behaviour as viewed by the disciplines of information processing and behavioural decision theory. The main theme of this module is consumer’s decisions as driven by factors internal to the consumer him or herself (such as reasons, affect, automaticity, and goals). There are many areas of overlap across the broad topics to be covered in this module, and the papers students read for a given session may very well be relevant at other sessions. One important objective of this seminar is to help students develop the skill to identify such linkages.

BMK6102 Consumer Information Processing

1. To familiarize you with research in social psychology and marketing that may help you to understand how different marketing strategies affect consumer behavior.
2. To give you a strong foundation for critical thinking in the area of consumer behavior.
3. To enable you to conceptualize, operationalize, and develop research ideas.

Therefore, the focus is on understanding current theoretical and methodological approaches to various aspects of consumer behavior, as well as advancing this knowledge by developing testable hypotheses and theoretical perspectives that build on the current knowledge base. This means that you have to actively read prior research in different areas -- try to understand the authors' ideas and develop the habit of constructive criticism of the research.

BMK6104 Marketing Research and Theory

This module provides marketing doctoral students with a historical perspective on how marketing theory has evolved through the years (e.g., what is marketing?), and the critical issues confronting marketers and consumer researchers today (e.g., positivist versus interpretivist paradigms). Using classic and contemporary articles, the module prepares students to analyse marketing and consumer research from various theoretical perspectives. Students are challenged to critically evaluate what constitutes a good theory, and to explore alternative ways of doing research and obtaining knowledge. A paper addressing a conceptual or empirical issue in marketing theory is required at the end of the module.

BMK6105 Independent Study

The supervisor and student will determine an appropriate set of readings that will largely form the basis of the students’ thesis/dissertation. The supervisor will schedule regular meetings with the student to ensure that readings are up-to-date and well-understood. A term paper is required.

BMK6106 Empirical Models in Marketing (I)

This module covers empirical models in marketing and provides students with deep understanding of data analysis and modeling issue in marketing. It includes empirical models on the analysis of scanner panel data (individual or household level) as well as aggregate data (store, account, market, regional or national levels). The topics include brand choice, category choice (purchase incidence), store choice, purchase quantity, and purchase timing, relating to the various consumer decisions (where to buy, whether to buy, what to buy, and how much to buy), either separately or jointly. It also covers empirical IO models. Estimation methods include MLE, GMM, SMLE, and Maximum Score. All topics are empirical in nature. Data and basic Gauss and SAS code are provided for the models covered. Relevant readings are also provided. Students are required to work with raw data, cleaning the data, writing their code, estimating the models, and writing reports.

This course is intended for 1st and 2nd year Ph.D. students. There are no readings required prior to each class session. However, I will provide readings once we have covered a topic in class.

In this module, you should be able to achieve the following abilities:

(1) To grasp marketing models and cutting-edge empirical methodologies
(2) To apply cutting-edge marketing models to real research questions
(3) To write critical reviewer’s report on papers that involve empirical models
(4) To communicate effectively and efficiently about the cutting edge modeling tools in marketing

BMK6107 Empirical Models in Marketing (II)

The past two decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in the use of Bayesian statistical methods in the marketing literature. Such methods are now used across a wide range of substantive areas of research. PhD students of varied interests use such methods for their dissertation research and thereafter. This module will focus on recent developments and applications of Bayesian methods in marketing. It has five specific objectives:

a) develop a deep understanding of those streams of the marketing literature which commonly use Bayesian methods.
b) develop a rigorous understanding of the specification of hierarchical Bayesian models and how they differ from other empirical models in marketing.
c) provide hands-on experience in estimating Bayesian models.
d) provide a forum to build skills for communicating academic research based on Bayesian methods (both written and oral)
e) provide a forum to develop independent research ideas which could benefit from Bayesian methods.

BMK6100 Special Topics in Marketing (4MC)

This module is to provide marketing doctoral students with an orientation to current research in the field of marketing. The primary objectives are to provide students with exposure to representative samples of significant research streams, current issues, and research priorities in the marketing field, and to introduce doctoral students to the research interests of the NUS marketing faculty and visiting professors.

BMK6111 Special Topics in Marketing (2MC)

This module is to provide marketing doctoral students with an orientation to current research in the field of marketing. The primary objectives are to provide students with exposure to representative samples of significant research streams, current issues, and research priorities in the marketing field, and to introduce doctoral students to the research interests of the NUS marketing faculty and visiting professors.

BMK6111 will be taught over 6½ weeks and not 13 weeks and the total workload will equal to 65 hours (half of a 4MC PhD module).

BZD6001 Model Building Workshop I: Static Models

This course covers the development and use of models to study interactive decision-making by individuals and firms. The basic building blocks of model building, including backward induction, mixed and dominant strategies, and strategic equilibria are developed. The roles of asymmetric information, moral hazard, mechanism design, signaling and incentives are also introduced.

BZD6008 Cognition Affect

This module intends to familiarize students with fundamental research on social psychology, and to help students develop skills including generating and conceptualizing ideas, critical thinking, and designing studies. Topics include:

Thinking:
1. Perception and attention
2. Learning and memory
3. Automaticity, implicit processes, priming
4. Embodiment
5. Metacognition, fluency, and problem solving

Feeling:
6. Emotions and mood, including discrete emotions, affective ambivalence
7. Subjective well-being, stress and strain
8. Affect as information, affective forecasting
9. Perspective taking, empathy, anthropomorphism, dehumanization

Understanding:
10. Influence and persuasion
11. Attitude measurement – preference, choice, evaluation, context effects
12. Self and identity, egoism-altruism, prosocial behavior

BZD6012 Experimental Design

This course is aimed at doctoral students who intend to conduct experimental and quasi-experimental research for the study of individuals’ behavior in business (e.g., marketing, organizational behavior) and related disciplines (e.g., psychology). Topics include factorial designs, repeated (within-subject) and mixed designs, analysis of covariance, and mediation analysis. Importantly, the course examines these designs and analyses from the perspective of an applied behavioral researcher, not from that of a statistician. That is, the course emphasizes the actual use of proper data collection procedures and analyses techniques for rigorous theory testing instead of focusing on statistical theory per se.