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Coursework

Department of Accounting

 

Department of Decision Sciences

Department of Finance


Department of Management & Organisation

Department of Marketing


Department of Strategy & Policy




Course descriptions
Department of Accounting

BAA6001 Accounting Research Seminars I

The objective of the course is to introduce students to research topics in accounting. Both theoretical and empirical research will receive much attention in the course. The students will understand which accounting issues are important, why they are important, and how these research issues might be explored. Selected accounting research issues covered in the course are informational perspective of accounting, measurement perspective of accounting, positive accounting research, earnings management, disclosure quality, etc.

BAA6002 Accounting Research Seminars II
This course exposes students to more advanced research topics in accounting. Issued covered include earnings quality, disclosure quality, mark to market, executive compensation, standard setting, income taxes, institutional ownerships, relevance of earnings to valuation, etc.


Department of Decision Sciences

BDC6111 Foundations of Optimization (4MC)
Pre-requisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): A basic knowledge of linear algebra
This course will cover important topics in optimization theory including linear, network, discrete, convex, conic, stochastic and robust. It will focus on methodology, modeling techniques and mathematical insights. This is a core module for PhD students in the Decision Science department.

BDC6112 Stochastic Processes (4MC)
This module aims to provide PhD students with a rigorous introduction to stochastic processes. Examples showing how various concepts and techniques in stochastic processes can be adapted to solve real world problems will be discussed.

BDC6113 Foundations of Inventory Management (4MC)
This course will provide an in-depth study of a variety of production and inventory control planning problems, the development of mathematical models corresponding to these problems, approaches to characterize solutions, and algorithm designs for finding solutions. We will cover deterministic as well as stochastic inventory models. Although many of the topics we will cover are of great interest to managers, our focus will not be on practice but on theory.

BDC6114 Logistics and Supply Chain (4MC)
The objective of this course is to expose students to the issues that need to be considered in designing and operating logistics and supply chains. We will start with an introduction including definition of logistics and supply chain management, key supply chain costs and metrics, and fundamental issues and trade-offs in supply chain management.
We will then discuss the interactions between stages in a supply chain, double marginalization and contracts for supply chain coordination, strategic alliances and incentive alignment, channels of distribution, coordinating distribution strategies, pricing/promotions. We will also discuss supply chain planning, facility location models, and vehicle routing models.

BDC6218 Seminars in Optimization I (2MC)
This is an advanced PhD-level module on Optimization that builds on the foundations developed in BDC6111. Specific content of this module will depend on student and faculty interests. This module will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to cutting-edge research topics related to Optimization that are not otherwise included in the curriculum.


BDC6219 Seminars in Optimization II (2MC)

This is an advanced PhD-level module on Optimization that builds on the foundations developed in BDC6111. Specific content of this module will depend on student and faculty interests. This module will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to cutting-edge research topics related to Optimization that are not otherwise included in the curriculum.

BDC6221 Stochastic Modelling and Optimization (4MC)
Pre-requisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): Students should preferably have basic knowledge of stochastic processes which could be fulfilled by taking the module BDC6112 or IE6004.
Stochastic models are used extensively to analyze and optimize in a wide variety of applications including business operations, economic systems, finance and engineering. This module provides the core knowledge for graduate students specializing in operation management and management sciences. Topic covered includes dynamic programming, stochastic ordering and their applications.

BDC6228 Seminars in Stochastic Processes I (2MC)
This is an advanced PhD level module on stochastic processes that builds on the foundations developed in BDC 6221. Specific content of this module will depend on student and faculty interests. This module will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to cutting-edge research topics related to stochastic modeling or stochastic optimization that are not otherwise included in the curriculum.

BDC6229 Seminars in Stochastic Process II (2MC)
This is an advanced PhD level module on stochastic processes that builds on the foundations developed in BDC 6221. Specific content of this module will depend on student and faculty interests. This module will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to cutting-edge research topics related to stochastic modeling or stochastic optimization that are not otherwise included in the curriculum.


Department of Finance


BFA6001 Accounting Research Seminars

The objective of the course is to introduce students to research topics in accounting. Both theoretical and empirical research will receive much attention in the course. The students will understand which accounting issues are important, why they are important, and how these research issues might be explored. Selected accounting research issues covered in the course are informational perspective of accounting, measurement perspective of accounting, positively accounting research, earnings management, corporate governance, managerial planning and control.

BFA6002 Finance Theory
This is a foundation course in investment decision making and asset pricing. The topics covered in the course are utility theory, decision making under uncertainty, mean-variance portfolio analysis, portfolio separation, equilibrium pricing in static and dynamic economies, risk neutral pricing in static and dynamic economies, stochastic discount factor interpretation of asset pricing, and asset pricing with differential information.

BFA6003 Corporate Finance
This is a foundation (theory) course of corporate finance. The course reviews basic concepts of game theory, information economics, contract theory used in corporate finance theory. The topics cover financial structure, financing investment, tax system, dividend policy, M&A, and bankruptcy and reorganisation.

BFA6004 Empirical Finnce
This course deals with the fundamental ideas and issues tackled in empirical research in finance. It provides a basic overview of the theoretical concepts underpinning financial models as well as the methodology employed to test these models. The course surveys a wide range of empirical work and key empirical papers on the topics selected. The selection of topics and papers will change from year to year and might include asset pricing models, market efficiency, market anomalies, return predictability, behavioral finance, market microstructure, trading mechanisms, volatility models, and international finance.

BFA6007 Empirical Analysis in Finance
This module is to train the first-year finance doctoral students’ basic empirical research abilities. The students will be taught and practice working with various financial datasets, analytical programming, and basic empirical methods. The primary objectives are to train ability to apply textbook learning of econometric and finance theories to solve specific finance research questions and to help them make the smooth transit from the style of acquiring knowledge to creating knowledge.


Department of Management & Organisation
BMO6001 Seminar In Organizational Behavior
This seminar will explore the major issues and debates in the field of Organizational Behavior, with particular emphasis on the behavior of individuals and small groups in the organizational context. Students will be required to critically analyze the theories and supporting research relating to these various issues. Basic knowledge of organizational behavior, social science research methods and statistics will be necessary. In addition to extensive readings and discussions, each student will be required to submit two term papers, which summarize knowledge and research in two topics and will include a research proposal to address an outstanding issue/debate in the area.

BMO6002 Seminar in Organizational Theory
The seminar in Organizational Theory provides the students with a broad overview of the field as well as an in-depth look at the current debates and the emerging picture in the field. We will read and discuss classical organizational sociology and the emergent fields such as organizational economics, institutional theory, network theory and organizational ecology. The students will be expected to engage in independent reading, interpretation and debate. During the semester, the students will submit two short papers on topics of their choice, and a final term paper with an integrative theme. This paper should demonstrate a deep understanding of the material, an ability to integrate literature, and independent conceptual development.

BMO6003 Seminar in Human Resource Management
This seminar provides students with exposure to both current and classic research and theory in human resource management. As a research-oriented seminar class, this course is designed to strengthen your ability to summarize, critique, and evaluate research topic areas; allow you to work on your discussion leadership skills; and give you practice writing and presenting a research proposal or review. Given that the class is a small one, you will have the opportunity to communicate your ideas and thoughts about the readings to others. Likewise, you will be expected to listen both critically and positively to other peoples’ thoughts and ideas.

BMO6004 Seminar in Research Methodology

This course focuses on the skills involved in understanding, evaluating, conducting and reporting research in the behavioral sciences. Topics addressed include the philosophy of science, theory building in behavioral sciences research, hypotheses development, alternative inquiry methods such as quantitative and qualitative research, and research design among others. The course will address experimental design, survey research, qualitative research methods and emerging streams of research. The course is conducted as a seminar with extensive, readings and preparation. A reasonable knowledge of statistics and a basic knowledge of social science research are necessary for this course. Students are expected to rely on themselves to conduct independent projects as part of the course.

BMO6006 Independent Study
The supervisor and student will determine an appropriate set of readings that will largely form the basis of the student's thesis/dissertation. The supervisor will schedule regular meetings with the student to ensure that readings are up-to-date and well-understood. A term paper is required.

BMO6007 Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
The focus of this class is on applying quantitative tools to research projects in fields of management and other behavioral sciences. New statistical models are introduced more at the conceptual and application levels rather than mathematical level. Students get hands-on experience in using statistical software to analyze real data sets in this class. Topics include data management, multivariate regression, factor analysis & structure equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling, longitudinal data analysis, meta-analysis, and survival analysis. Target students are graduate research students in fields of management and other behavioral sciences in the Business school and other faculties.

BMO6008 Seminar in OB & Mgt: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
The field of OB (Organizational Behavior) needs to know how organizations get started and developed – this is the field of entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship needs to know how new ideas get developed – this is the field of innovation. The module presents the current scientific knowledge on entrepreneurs, how they behave and what are effective and ineffective behaviors – all of this from the OB perspective. It further asks the question, how innovations are developed. Entrepreneurship and innovations exist in small and large organizations, in for profit and in non-for-profit organizations (e.g., as organizational culture). Thus, this is basic knowledge for OB PhDs. 

Department of Marketing
BMK6101 Marketing Seminar 1 (Modeling)
This seminar will introduce students to the fundamentals of modeling in marketing. Among the topics we will cover include marketing models and implementation, market segmentation, pricing, market structure, market share, market entry/timing, and distribution channels. We will rely heavily on journal articles in discussing these topics. Students are expected to be fully prepared for all readings. A research proposal on a topic (to be approved by instructor) based on those covered in this seminar is due at the end of the semester.

BMK6102 Marketing Seminar 2 (Modeling)
Similar to MK5101, this seminar will rely on journal articles for our weekly discussions. Building on your knowledge of MK5101, microeconomics and mathematical statistics, the topics we cover here include forecasting, new product diffusion, product models, product design, advertising and promotion, consumer choice, and sales force management. The deliverable will be a research proposal, which may form the genesis of your dissertation.

BMK6103 Marketing Seminar 3 (Consumer Behavior)

This course provides marketing doctoral students with an overview of the consumer behavior literature. The emphasis is on understanding the conceptualization and examination of research issues in the field. The key conceptual and empirical research streams in consumer behavior (e.g., information processing, memory and learning, cognition and affect, the self and identity, group influences, symbolic consumption behavior, consumption communities, etc) will be discussed in class. Students will read relevant journal articles from the leading publications in consumer behavior, and participate actively in class discussions. They are expected, not only to learn about and synthesize the ideas of other consumer researchers, but to identify and develop their own research interests. A paper expressing an initial research agenda is required at the end of the course.

BMK6104 Marketing Seminar 4 (Consumer Behavior)
This course provides marketing doctoral students with a historical perspective on how marketing theory has evolved through the years (e.g., what is marketing?), and the critical issues confronting marketers and consumer researchers today (e.g., positivist versus interpretivist paradigms). Using classic and contemporary articles, the course prepares students to analyze marketing and consumer research from various theoretical perspectives. Students are challenged to critically evaluate what constitutes a good theory, and to explore alternative ways of doing research and obtaining knowledge. A paper addressing a conceptual or empirical issue in marketing theory is required at the end of the course.

BMK6106 Empirical Marketing Models 4
This module covers empirical models in marketing and provides students with deep understanding of data analysis and modeling issue in marketing. It includes empirical models on the analysis of scanner panel data (individual or household level) as well as aggregate data (store, account, market, regional or national levels). The topics include brand choice, category choice (purchase incidence), store choice, purchase quantity, and purchase timing, relating to the various consumer decisions (where to buy, whether to buy, what to buy and how much to buy), either separately or jointly. It also covers empirical IO models. Estimation methods include MLE, GMM, SMLE, and Maximum Score. All topics are empirical in nature. Data and basic Gauss, Matlab, SAS or R code are provided for the models covered. Relevant readings are also provided. Students are required to work with raw data, cleaning the data, writing their code, estimating the models and writing reports.

BMK6108 Game Theory
Game Theory provides a scientific approach in the analysis of situations "involving two or more participants, each trying to influence, to outguess, or to adapt to the decision or lines of behavior that others have just adopted, or are expected to adopt" (Thomas Schelling).

There are three parts to this seminar. Firstly, the fundamental knowledge of Game Theory as a research tool to analyze strategic problems in the various areas of business, including marketing, operations and finance will be presented. Thereafter, research papers will be discussed. Finally, the course ends with the participants presenting their research ideas which requires the use of game theory.


Department of Strategy & Policy

BBP6781 Seminar in Strategy I – (4MC)
This seminar surveys the major theoretical perspectives and issues studied in strategic management research. The course draws upon theoretical perspectives from economics, sociology and organization theory to supplement more traditional strategy approaches towards understanding firm performance and related issues. An illustrative list of the issues addressed in strategy research includes identifying the profit potential of industries, exploring relationships between firm resources, behaviour and performance, and understanding the managerial and organizational determinants of firm level outcomes. Many of the issues examined, for example, vertical integration, firm diversification, industry structure, and inter-organizational cooperation, are also common themes in other disciplines such as industrial organization economics, marketing, and organizational and economic sociology.

BBP6782A Seminar in Strategy IIA – (2MC)
This seminar focuses on the contemporary research on the corporate level strategy such as diversification, restructuring, joint ventures and alliances, and mergers and acquisitions. It also covers the issues of corporate governance and firm performance.

BBP6782B Seminar in Strategy IIB – (2MC)
This seminar addresses strategic decision making processes such as satisficing, logical incrementalism. Topics include entrepreneurial, planning and adaptive models as well as organizational learning. Involvement of organizational members and strategy as an outcome of bargaining and negotiating among factions are also covered.

BBP6791 Seminar in International Business – (2MC)
This course focuses on research in international business - especially international business strategy and foreign direct investment. The objectives of this course are three-fold: to discuss past and current research in these areas, to aid students when framing and designing research projects in these areas, and to challenge the current state of knowledge in the field and discuss avenues for future research.

BBP6792 Econometrics for Management Research – 4MC
This is an applied course in PhD level econometrics, with special focus on empirical issues in strategy management research. The focus is on cross section and panel issues. Topics include single equation analysis, system estimations, simultaneous equation analysis, panel data analysis, and limited dependent variable models (discrete, count and duration dependent variables).

IS6004 Econometrics for IS Research – 4MC
Ever since the beginning of research into information systems, economics has been recognized as one of the most important reference disciplines. Economics has made useful contributions to the understanding of information systems research and applications. Some examples include the theory of information, decision analysis, game theory, and econometric methodologies. The objective of this course is to equip graduate students with econometrics research methodologies pertaining to the analysis of IT/IS, and to help students understand emerging IS-economics and econometric issues.

BBP6793 Economic Modeling for Management Research – 4MC
This course introduces contemporary economic analytical tools and concepts to strategy Ph.D. students. It begins with basic game theory and information economics models and concepts. The course then introduces their applications in diverse managerial scenarios, such as product competition, pricing strategies, R&D competition and cooperation, advertising, product differentiation, merger and acquisition, and internal organization. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to apply these modeling skills to research managerial issues in strategy.

BBP6794 Seminar in Innovation and Entreprenurship - (2MC)
(New module) Special Topics in this seminar surveys the core conceptual issues in innovation and entrepreneurship research, examines the key theoretical approaches for addressing these issues, and reviews the major past and current research work that have made significant contribution to our understanding of these issues. The seminar will draw on the core disciplines of economics, sociology, strategy and organizational behaviour and apply them to identify and answer key questions in innovation and entrepreneurship.

BBP6880 Special Topics in Strategy Research I, (1MC)
Pre-requisite BBP6871 Strategy Research Seminar I

This graduate seminar presents current, ongoing research streams in the field of strategy. Each session will focus on the recent evolution of a stream of research in strategy, considering both theoretical and empirical perspectives. May be repeated for credit.
The principal objective of this seminar is to keep students up to date with recent advanced scholarship into strategy. The seminar also aims to develop skills, which are useful when pursuing an academic career, such as synthesizing research, understanding research designs, and building theories.
This seminar builds upon BBP6871 Strategy Research Seminar I which surveys the major theoretical perspectives and issues in strategic management research and familiarize students with more recent and more advanced topics in strategy research.

BBP6881 Special Topics in Strategy Research II, (2MC)
Pre-requisite BBP6871 Strategy Research Seminar I

This graduate seminar presents current, ongoing research streams in the field of strategy. Each session will focus on the recent evolution of a stream of research in strategy, considering both theoretical and empirical perspectives. May be repeated for credit.
The principal objective of this seminar is to keep students up to date with recent advanced scholarship into strategy. The seminar also aims to develop skills, which are useful when pursuing an academic career, such as synthesizing research, understanding research designs, and building theories.
This seminar builds upon BBP6871 Strategy Research Seminar I which surveys the major theoretical perspectives and issues in strategic management research and familiarize students with more recent and more advanced topics in strategy research.